Entrepreneurs face Anxiety, Fear

0plateIn September, 2013, Inc. Magazine‘s Jessica Bruder discusses the issues that entrepreneurs face with regard to mental illness. They often suffer from depression, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or bipolar disorder. Entrepreneurs are often swept up in new ideas and bouts of creativity that are actually mania or can mirror the symptoms of mania or hypomania. When followed by doubt in their business or product, failure to see growth, failure to make certain incomes, or not achieving certain markers of success, there can be depressive feelings. If these phases cycle, it can mimic bipolar disorder, or be an expression of bipolar disorder. Anxiety is often found in the entrepreneur as he/she worries about product launch, deadlines, and if the business is “good enough” to be a hit. The tendency to jump form one part of the project to the next is often a marker for ADHD and adults with ADHD will gravitate toward work that allows them to function in time with their brain chemistry.

lionInc. Magazine‘s article uses the metaphor of a man riding a lion. Everyone looks at the man and says, “Wow, he’s so brave,” while the man is thinking “How did I get on this lion and how do I keep it from eating me?”

I can speak to many of these feelings as I’m the owner of one business, the co-owner of another business, and a published author. As someone with my hands in many pots, I understand the struggle to want to see a project to fruition while at the same time spinning all the plates on broom handles and letting none of them fall, giving proper care to each one. This is no easy task on the best of days, and some days are not the best.

To be a successful entrepreneur:

  1. Balance your life. Find time for everything. I know, I know, but there’s so much to do already! Do it anyway. Work, play, relax, exercise, eat well, drink only in moderation, feed the business monster all that it needs, and spend time with friends.
  2. Be honest. Tell your friends and family what is going on with your business. Tell them where you are struggling. Ask for support and for help when needed. Maybe one of your friends is fantastic with spreadsheets and would be willing to spend 30 minutes getting part of your project organized for you so you can be freed up for innovation. Maybe hiring a temp for a day would get your marketing caught up so fliers can go out on time. If people don’t know where you are with things, they can’t be there for you in the ways you need and may see your struggles as less than (or more than) you feel them to be.
  3. Set goals. Studies have shown that people who have realistic goals and are marking progress toward them are the happiest people. Set a long term goal and break that down into many short term goals with due dates or markers. Break those down even further so you know what needs to be done this month, this week, and today to get those goals met. Cross them off; mark your progress. Even if a deadline slips because life gets in the way, you know exactly where you are and nothing is “ruined”, just delayed. With this kind of organization, sometimes you can anticipate delays and make up time.
  4. Seek help. If you have a chemical imbalance or feel that the amount of anxiety or depression you are facing is due to an insurmountable stressor, ask for help. There are many good therapists and psychiatrists out there who can get you back on track.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on Twitter and Facebook.

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Plan your Success – Keep your Resolutions by Planning Ahead

0paLet’s think about the year that was and the year to be:

  • What goals did you set for yourself this year and how close did you get to meeting them?
  • Did you make some progress?
  • What were your obstacles?
  • Do you know how you can overcome those obstacles in the future?
  • What are your new or revised goals?
  • What’s the best way you see to get there?
  • How do you need assistance in setting your intention or cementing your target – what you might think of as “motivation?”

Hypnotherapy is a great way to set your target, and coaching is available to drop in every few weeks and keep the pace up so you reach your goals and tweak any little changes along the way. Let me assist you for the best you.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

Entrepreneur Success

0clEntrepreneurs are faced with stressors that are uncommon among the rest of society. There is an ebb and flow of fear and excitement, worry about project failure and success, a feeling of being an impostor, anxiety over being in over your head, self-assuredness and self-doubt.

When explained to a 9 to 5 employee, these things make no sense as a pattern for every day living. People will wonder if you’re crazy for this emotional roller coaster – and so will you. It only makes sense that those who are up late and up early with ideas, who are perceiving the pressures of time and deadlines differently will be seen as different. You even see yourself as different.

Having a therapist who is also an entrepreneur allows you to skip the explanations and get right into the feeling better – and knowing what you need. This saves valuable time in therapy and benefits you immediately.

Call for an appointment to reduce the stress of being an entrepreneur. 954-612-9553

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

The Blah Days of Depression

Depression has a range of emotions within it, like the all-consuming “blah.”

Unlovable

Today is a blah day.

It isn’t that there is anything terribly wrong today.  There are issues looming, yes, but there are always issues of late.  There is nothing pressing, though.

It is just a blah day.

A day where I lay in bed, struggling to find a reason to get up.  I have had to pee for a couple hours now yet the dull ache in my bladder is not enough to pull me from under my covers.  I should probably get a drink, too, and brush my teeth, maybe get dressed and get a bite to eat.  I have been awake for over 5 hours now, since even before the sun rose, yet here I still lay.

I feel blah.  While the world around me continues with it’s hustle and bustle, I have no motivation, no desire to do anything.  Nothing seems interesting or important, nothing is pressing enough…

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Multitask Efficiently without Comparison

0autWhen I meet someone new, inevitably, they ask “What do you do for a living?” There’s always a moment of awkward silence where I figure out what to state first – usually whatever has the newest project happening or what I think will resonate with the listener. My friends always laugh in that pause because they know there’s a litany of answers coming. My husband says he has the same pause when people ask “What does your wife do? Is she in software, too?” My husband has a 9-5 job, just one, but is also co-owner of our board game business.

I answer, usually all in one breath, and they squint at me with one eyebrow raised skeptically and look at our mutual friend for confirmation, who always nods enthusiastically. Some people say “I’m tired just by hearing that.” And I think many people assume I must not do all those things well, but that’s untrue; I’m an overachiever and I do it all well, eventually. Read also: You Can for how to break things into tiny do-able steps.

Here’s the answer to “What do you do for a living, Autumn?”

“I have 6 jobs, presently, and a project. I own 1 company and co-own 2 others. In my one company, I’m a hypnotherapist specializing in trauma and short-term therapies, and I supervise interns. In the other two, my husband and I create board games; our first one should be up on Kickstarter in the next few months, but I can demo it for you, if you’re interested. I also write books and have 2 published on Amazon and 3 more in the works. I teach psychology at the college level. I work part time supervising visitation for parents. I’m also working on the business plan for the substance abuse center I want to open in the next two years.”

Are you tired just looking at that? I get tired just saying all that, but it’s 100% true. And that does not even account for the side projects that I’m always considering, investing in, and collaborating on, nor does it include my Mastermind Group that meets every other week or the practice group I organize that meets monthly.

People also ask “Do you sleep?” I sleep almost 8 hours every night. I eat. I exercise. I read a lot. I watch TV almost every day. I spend time with my friends at least once a week. I listen to audio books in the car. I go on vacations. I pay my bills on time. I also do my own nails every week. I love my full life.

My to-do list HAS to be organized. I use a system called Sticky Notes that’s pre-installed on my desktop computer (and Evernote when I’m making “don’t forget” notes in my cell phone) to keep track of all my projects. They’re each coded in a different color. As I do things, I delete them to leave the note empty. I start work most days around 8am, take a lunch break, and quit around 6pm, depending on that day’s projects, though sometimes I’m working until midnight, and some days I get a case of the “I Can’ts” and do absolutely nothing but watch TV all day; there’s a happy balance in there.

And, just to understand that the way I think and work is sane, once I week, I watch How to Do All the Things with Hank Green, my long-lost twin.

0camRecently, I was working on a list of interns to market supervision to and listening to videos including Ugly Behind-the-Scenes with Jeff Walker, marketing guru. He stated you should not compare your back end with anyone else’s front end. I also shot the video commercial for an upcoming webinar and figured I’d share with you my back-end. That’s my portable video camera on top of my printer and some paper with my script held up by the phone and a stapler. So do I have it all together? Yeah, no, sort of. I get a lot done. But it is not glamorous. As an entrepreneur, I’m plagued with massive excitement and crippling doubt, so I know I’m doing it right as all the Inc. articles seem to echo those feelings.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

40 Minute Guilt Session

0womanWatching clients transform is my favorite thing!

One morning, I covered for a colleague who does talk therapy while that therapist was out on vacation. The clients cannot be rescheduled as they are court mandated to attend. I had an hour with a client whom I had never met, and thus had no rapport to begin with; we were starting as strangers. Having covered this population for the colleague previously, I expected that she would merely want to chat the hour down and get her credit for being where she needed to be; but I was wrong.

I introduced myself and asked if she had anything she wanted to get done or just wanted to kill down the clock. She said “actually, there is something.” “Oh, great! What’s up?” She discussed her feelings of guilt and shame over having been away from her children while incarcerated and feeling somewhat removed from them now that she was back in their lives. She had suffered again by knowing they could live without her and was feeling unnecessary and unwanted. When it came to discussing these things with her loved ones, she stated she did not want them to feel upset or ashamed, so she merely said nothing.

After listening for about 20 minutes, I began the process of disassembling guilt. I was unsure how much we could get done in under the 40 minutes we had remaining as I could hear the layers of pain and faulty thinking, like multiple colors of old paint she had laid over the truth. But with just a moment to spare, we wrapped up and she said she could no longer get in touch with the feelings of guilt and shame any more and was eager to sit down with her family and be vulnerable with how she felt while incarcerated and now, and whatever they said in response would be perfectly acceptable to her.

Sometimes therapy is like a leisurely walk, and sometimes it is a sprint, but that finish line for the client makes it all worthwhile.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

Ethical Treatment is Confidential

hippa
This is a joke. HIPAA is no joke.

HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and is what is in place to keep mental health professionals from discussing cases.

Ethical therapists like myself take this seriously. Things that are private:

  • The fact that you are a client.
  • Particulars of a case.
  • Particulars of a client.
  • Length or type of services.
  • Identifying information such as name, location, or details that may identify a client.

Ethical therapist can discuss a case with their peers without their peers having any clue as to whom the case is about. The less details given, the better. Only the details needed to get help with a case are discussed, and a clear goal in the consultation is established.

For example: This celebrity case can be consulted in these two ways:

  1. Client is a 56 year old man, married, with no children. He is being seen for relationship issues as his wife is only 21 and she feels that her mother and he are inappropriately close. How can I best work with him on boundaries?
  2. I’d like suggestions on working with boundary issues, when there is a discrepancy between how spouses internalize and work through jealousy and family dynamics with people outside of their relationship.

Do you see how the second one was more ethically described? This is a skill that I pride myself on and teach to my interns so we have even more ethical therapists.

Did you recognize Doug Hutchison (husband of Courtney Stodden) in this example? They chose to take their relationship issues to television therapists and make their story public. You may choose absolute privacy.

For confidential care, please call to schedule an appointment at 954-612-9553.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

The Chiropractic Model of Therapy

0brainTherapy is best served in a model like that of chiropractors.

Imagine you’ve strained your neck.

  1. When you are in acute physical pain, you come in for several sessions close together until relief is gained, usually over a week or two. Let’s say this is 3 times the first week and 2 times the second week.
  2. Now that your pain is moderate, but no longer limiting your range of movement, you come once a week for a few weeks until the pain is minimal. Let’s say this is 3 sessions over 3 weeks.
  3. Once that neck pain is minimal, but still present, you come less often until it is gone. Maybe this is a visit every 2 weeks twice and then every 3 weeks once.
  4. Once the pain is gone, the injury may still be present in the form of swelling or a ligament out of place or some misalignment in the vertebrae, so you come once a month twice and then every 3 months twice to finish the adjustment.
  5. The body is adjusted, and you follow up every 6-12 months just to check that all is well, provided nothing new is hurting the neck. Of course, if you have a new injury, you begin again on that area of the body.

Imagine you’ve experienced a trauma, been depressed, had anxiety, or someone close to you had died. Your mental health is just as important as your physical health!

  1. When you are in acute psychological pain, you come in for several sessions close together until relief is gained, usually over a week or two. Let’s say this is 3 times the first week and 2 times the second week. Sessions can also be longer instead of more frequent, or both.
  2. Now that your pain is moderate, but no longer limiting your daily functioning, you come once a week for a few weeks until the pain is minimal. Let’s say this is 3 sessions over 3 weeks. Again, session length is flexible to accommodate your specific needs.
  3. Once that internal pain is minimal, but still present, you come less often until it is gone. Maybe this is a visit every 2 weeks twice and then every 3 weeks once.
  4. Once you feel you are coping well, there may be some additional items that come up as you work through the one you came in for, so you come once a month twice and then every 3 months twice to get you back to optimal mental health.
  5. The mind is well, and you follow up every 6-12 months just to check that all is going the way you want it to, provided nothing new has happened that is upsetting. Of course, if you have a new circumstance, you begin again on that area of treatment, targeting the therapy to only what is necessary.

Proper follow up and routine mental health care could eliminate certain problems from becoming large or provide additional tools to get through stressful times as preventative care.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

Easy & Secure Payments

0appleWe use technology for the most secure and convenient payment methods possible. We have a chip reader that protects you against the magstripe having fraudulent charges.

You can even pay with ApplePay or with AndroidPay.

And, as always, if you ever forget your method of payment, we can charge your card on file for you on the date of your service, or you can pay via Paypal.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.

Your Money Story – guest blog by Stephanie Steen

0ssMONEY!

It is one of those things in life that people both love and hate!

Unfortunately, money can negatively impact both your physical and mental health. Being in debt and missing payments can cause physical health problems such as ulcers and can affect depression and chronic stress. Even if you are not in debt, money can be a burden on your life and your relationship.

That is because you enter adulthood with a money story. Your money story can change and develop as you find your place in the world.

So what exactly is a money story?

Your money story is how you look at and react to different financial situations. It is based on how you grew up and the struggles or benefits you had.

To start writing your money story think about:

  • What was your family’s financial status growing up?
  • Did you get the things you needed or were there times you went without?
  • Did your family have an extreme increase or decrease (lost job or inheritance)?
  • What did your family teach you about money?
  • What is your current relationship with money?
  • What about money now makes you feel positive or negative?
  • What do you feel money can buy?
  • Write a paragraph about money and see what pops up.

Your money story affects your mental health when your life is not congruent to the thoughts you have about money.

Let’s say for example your money story includes growing up with a decent amount of money. You had everything that you needed plus most of what you wanted. Your parents prided themselves on being able to provide. You saw that your parents worked hard, but maybe you did not see them very often because of that.

As an adult raising a family you now struggle with making money and balancing that with having a family. You live paycheck to paycheck. You struggle with wanting to make more money and wanting to be home. Your struggles come from the incongruency in your life and your story.

Recognizing your money story can help you understand the stress you feel. It is a starting point to dive into what is most important and begin to accept or change where you are.

Stephanie Steen, Registered Mental Health Counseling Intern is a therapist in Melbourne FL. She works with women who are in the middle of a major life transition (divorce, loss of job) and helps them to see the light at the end of the tunnel so they can begin living authentically again. She shares tips on regaining happiness on her Facebook Page and website.  

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on TwitterFacebook, and Google+. Sign up for the e-newsletter HERE.